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    Titanium

    Published: June 01, 2008
    Authors: F.C. Campbell, Editor

    The primary advantages of titanium alloys are their combination of relatively low densities, high strengths, and excellent corrosion resistance. With a density of 4.5 g/ cm3 (0.16 lb/in.3), titanium is classified as a light metal and is only approximately half as heavy as steel and nickel-base superalloys.

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    Wrought Titanium and Titanium Alloys

    Published: 1990
    Authors: S. Lampman, ASM INTERNATIONAL

    THE WROUGHT product forms of titanium and titanium-base alloys, which include forgings and the typical mill products, constitute (on a weight basis) more than 70% of the market in titanium and titanium-alloy production. Various specifications for wrought titanium-base products are listed in Table.

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    Titanium and Titanium Alloys

    Published: December 01, 2001
    Authors: J.R. Davis, Editor

    General Characteristics. Titanium is a low-density element (? 4.5 g/cm3, which is about 60% of the density of iron) that can be highly strengthened by alloying and deformation processing. Titanium is nonmagnetic and has good heat-transfer properties.

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    Titanium and Titanium Alloy Castings

    Published: December 01, 2008
    Authors: Mustafa Guclu, Stanley Associates Inc.

    Since the introduction of titanium and titanium alloys in the early 1950s, these materials have become one of the backbone materials for the aerospace, energy, and chemical industries.

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    Corrosion of Titanium and Titanium Alloys

    Published: 2005
    Authors: Ronald W. Schutz, RMI Titanium Company

    TITANIUM ALLOYS were originally developed in the early 1950s for aerospace applications in which their high strength-to-density ratios were especially attractive.

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    Titanium and Titanium Alloy Castings

    Published: 1990
    Authors: Daniel Eylon, Graduate Materials Engineering, University of Dayton; Jeremy R. Newman and John K. Thorne, TiTech International, Inc.

    SINCE THE INTRODUCTION OF TITANIUM and titanium alloys in the early 1950s, these materials have in a relatively short time become backbone materials for the aerospace, energy, and chemical industries (Ref).

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    Introduction to Titanium and Titanium Alloys

    Published: 1990
    Authors: James D. Destefani* Formerly with ASM INTERNATIONAL , Bailey Controls Company

    TITANIUM has been recognized as an element for 200 years. Only in the last 40 years or so, however, has the metal gained strategic importance. In that time, commercial production of titanium and titanium alloys in the United States has increased from zero to more than 23 million kg/yr (50 million lb/yr).

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    Forming of Titanium and Titanium Alloys

    Published: 2006
    Authors: Joseph D. Beal, Rodney Boyer, and Daniel Sanders, The Boeing Company

    TITANIUM AND ITS ALLOYS can be formed in standard machines to tolerances similar to those obtained in the forming of stainless steel.

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    Processing of Titanium and Titanium Alloys

    Published: December 01, 1998
    Authors: J.R. Davis, Editor

    Titanium metal passes through three major steps during processing from ore to finished product: (1) reduction of titanium ore to a porous form of titanium metal called "sponge," (2) melting of sponge and scrap to form ingot, and (3) remelting and casting into finished shape, or primary fabrication, in which ingots are converted into general mill

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    Titanium Alloys

    Published: October 01, 2012
    Authors: F.C. Campbell, Editor

    Titanium is a lightweight metal (approximately 60% of the density of iron) that can be highly strengthened by alloying and deformation pro­cessing. Titanium is nonmagnetic and has good heat-transfer properties. Its coefficient of thermal expansion is somewhat lower than that of steels and less than half that of aluminum.

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