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    MATERIALS RESOURCES

    Carbon Steels

    Published: January 01, 1982
    Authors: Edited by P. Harvey

    Article on a Carbon steel, including information regarding Tensile, Hardness, Chemical composition, Machining.

    Material Resources / Publications

    Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Published: 2004
    Authors: P.J.F. Harris, University of Reading

    Carbon nanotubes are molecular-scale tubes of graphitic carbon with outstanding properties. They are among the stiffest and strongest fibres known, with Young's moduli as high as 1 TPa and tensile strengths of up to 63 GPa.

    Material Resources / Publications

    Plain Carbon Steels

    Published: June 01, 2008
    Authors: F.C. Campbell, Editor

    Plain carbon steels are the most important group of engineering alloys and account for the vast majority of steel produced. Their relatively low cost and wide range of useful properties make them attractive as engineering materials.

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    Arc Welding of Carbon Steels

    Published: 1993
    Authors: Ronald B. Smith, The ESAB Group, Inc.

    CARBON STEELS are defined as those steels containing up to 2% C, 1.65% Mn, 0.60% Si, and 0.60% Cu, with no deliberate addition of other elements to obtain a desired alloying effect. Tables and list some of the common grades of carbon steel that are covered in this article.

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    High-Manganese Carbon Steels

    Published: January 01, 1991
    Authors: Edited by G. Vander Voort

    Time-Temperature Curve for 1-1/4 Mn; 1-1/2 Mn; 1-3/4 Mn, a High-manganese carbon steel, including information regarding Chemical composition, Microstructure, Heat treating.

    Material Resources / Publications

    Low Carbon Steels

    Published: August 01, 2005
    Authors: George Krauss

    Low-carbon steels, steels that contain less than 0.25% C, make up the highest tonnage of all steels produced in a given year. Structural shapes and beams for buildings and bridges, plate for line pipe, and automotive sheet applications are just a few major applications for lowcarbon steels.

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    Corrosion of Wrought Carbon Steels

    Published: 2005
    Authors: Toshiaki Kodama, Nakabohtec Corrosion Protection Co., Ltd.

    CARBON STEEL is the most widely used engineering material, so the cost of dealing with corrosion of carbon steels is a significant portion of the total cost of corrosion. The latest report describes the annual total cost of metallic corrosion in the United States and the preventive strategies for optimal corrosion management (Ref).

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    Machining of Carbon and Alloy Steels

    Published: 1990
    Authors: M.E. Finn, Steltech, a subsidiary of Stelco, Inc.

    THE COMPETITIVE COST PERFORMANCE of machining steel is dependent on many factors, such as tool material, tool geometry, cutting velocity, cutting fluid, and tool/work support systems, as well as the properties of the steel workpiece. The workpiece mechanical properties influencing machinability are hardness, yield strength, and ductility.

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    Light Microscopy of Carbon Steels

    Published: 1999
    Authors: L.E. Samuels

    With a wealth of micrographs and the explanatory text to make them really useful, this book is a "must have" reference for all persons who select or evaluate steels. Each micrograph is accompanied by data on the composition, condition, etchant, and magnification.

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    Forging of Carbon and Alloy Steels

    Published: 2005
    Authors: C.J. Van Tyne, Colorado School of Mines

    FORGING OF STEELS in quantity has an extensive history since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Justification for selecting forging in preference to other, sometimes more economical, methods of producing useful shapes is based on several considerations.

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