Podcasts

Podcasts

To help bring materials information to future engineers and scientists, ASM asked its newest members — University Student Material Advantage members — to pass along their knowledge onto middle school students. To this end, ASM International started Materials Radio, a series of podcasts on materials and their uses.

  • The podcasts are mp3 files that can be played on your computer or downloaded

  • All of the podcasts are between two and four minutes long

  • Materials Around Us podcasts focus on items students see and touch

  • Science of Materials podcasts focus on basic materials concepts and properties

Any questions or suggestions – email us at materialsradio@asminternational.org.

PODCAST SEARCH

Web Content Listing

January 20, 2009
Author: Dirk DeGroot, Trevor DiMartino, University of Washington Material Advantage Chapter

Remember the time your baseball went through your neighbor's window? Listen to an interview between 'Karl' and 'Dr Pete' about the way things fracture.

Download size: 2 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

January 20, 2009
Author: Alex Hudgins, Colorado School of Mines Material Advantage Chapter

The theory of alloying is investigated through a few experiments involving boiling and freezing of salt water. A simple thought experiment demonstrates how alloy additions change the properties of pure systems.

Download size: 2 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 20, 2008
Author: Rachel Ferebec, Daniel Clifford, Jessica Grande, Tricia Kent, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Material Advantage Chapter

Recycling is similar to creating ice cubes. Water can be melted and frozen repeatedly without losing its properties. The same is true to an extent for some metals, glass, and polymers.

Download size: 1 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 20, 2008
Author: Tricia Kent, Daniel Clifford, Tolga Goren, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Material Advantage Chapter

Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials in the world. It is often used in structures like skyscrapers, roadways, and bridge supports. Concrete is an excellent material not only because it is versatile, but also because it is strong and durable.

Download size: 1 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 20, 2008
Author: Robert Middleton, Daniel Clifford, Jessica Grande, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Material Advantage Chapter

Skis depend on the unique properties of polymers, metals and composites to give them strength and flexibility.

Download size: 1 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 14, 2008
Author: Ellen Raberberg, Dan Osterberg, Boise State University Material Advantage Chapter

Metals are used in many common items in our lives. From coins to car frames, metal components come in many different sizes. Have you ever wondered how something so strong and hard is made into so many different shapes?

Download size: 2 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 14, 2008
Author: Jackie Forhan, Tram Bui, Boise State University Material Advantage Chapter

When you hear the words "ink-jet printer" you probably think about your computer printer and perhaps about printing out your English homework. Did you know that ink-jet printers can also be used to make three dimensional models? In fact, even Disney's Toy Story characters have been modeled by 3D inkjet printers!

Download size: 2 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 14, 2008
Author: Cole Smith, Shilo McCrory, Boise State University Material Advantage Chapter

Extrusion is a process for making things. During extrusion, a material that is very soft, like clay or partially melted plastic, is pushed through a hole to produce a shape. This is a lot like squeezing toothpaste out of a tube.

Download size: 2 MB

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November 14, 2008
Author: Pat Andersen, Chris Stifter, Boise State University Material Advantage Chapter

Have you ever used a part with a unique shape and wondered how it came to be? Chances are that many of these uniquely shaped materials were created by a process called casting. Casting is a common way to form complex shapes and starts with a liquified material.

Download size: 2 MB

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September 08, 2008
Author: Pat Anderson, Boise State University Materials Advantage Chapter

Suppose you hung a ten pound barbell with a thin piece of nylon rope in your living room, and measured it every week for a year. You would notice that the rope stretches a little further every week. That is creep.

Download size: 700 KB

Duration: $runningTime.data