Podcasts

Podcasts

To help bring materials information to future engineers and scientists, ASM asked its newest members — University Student Material Advantage members — to pass along their knowledge onto middle school students. To this end, ASM International started Materials Radio, a series of podcasts on materials and their uses.

  • The podcasts are mp3 files that can be played on your computer or downloaded

  • All of the podcasts are between two and four minutes long

  • Materials Around Us podcasts focus on items students see and touch

  • Science of Materials podcasts focus on basic materials concepts and properties

Any questions or suggestions – email us at materialsradio@asminternational.org.

PODCAST SEARCH

Web Content Listing

November 01, 2007
Author: Carlos Benitez Monllor, Jose Gonzalez, University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez Materials Advantage Chapter

Crystalline solids are those where the atoms are located in a repeating or periodic array. For example, if you were able to see this arrangement in a big scale, you will notice that this arrangement is similar to a bee's nest or more commonly known as a honeycomb. One the other hand, amorphous solids lack this regular arrangement.

Download size: 1 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 01, 2007
Author: Tenicka Turnquest, Dan Krauss, Heather McGee, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Materials Advantage Chapter

When you look out into the world, what you are actually seeing is the reflection of light off of objects. The light enters your eyes and your brain transforms the information into an image. The electron microscope is based on the same principle, but instead of beams of visible light, it uses a beam of electrons.

Download size: 2 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 01, 2007
Author: Cole Smith, Boise State University Materials Advantage Chapter

We all know that you can break something by putting a lot of force on it. But what happens if we keep putting a small amount of force on something and taking it off? This type of "cyclic stress" is called fatigue.

Download size: 2 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 01, 2007
Author: Mike Hagler, Boise State University Materials Advantage Chapter

Topics such as ductility, fatigue, creep and fracture are included in a discussion of catastrophic failure. All of these mechanisms in materials need to be considered when engineers design products for use in our daily lives. If they don't, catastrophic failures can occur.

Download size: 616 KB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 01, 2007
Author: Adam Kohn, Lehigh University Materials Advantage Chapter

Imagine that you could climb walls like Spiderman, wear swim goggles just by sticking them to your face, or tape together a wound instead of stitching it. These ideas may seem like dreams, but these dreams may one day become a reality with the development of nanocomposite materials.

Download size: 4 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data

November 01, 2007
Author: Pat Anderson and Sharla Hopkins, Boise State University Materials Advantage Chapter

Have you ever noticed that there are two different ways that things break? Some things break very suddenly, like a coffee mug dropped on the floor. Other things stretch and bend a lot before they break, like a metal coat hanger or plastic wrap.

Download size: 704 KB

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May 01, 2007
Author: Sarah Miller, Washington State University Materials Advantage Chapter

Annealing a metal involves heating the metal up. The metal must be hot enough for the atoms to have room to realign within the crystal lattice, but not hot enough to actually melt the metal.

Download size: 3 MB

Duration: $runningTime.data